Category: Education

What’s at the Root of Oregon’s Education Problems? (Steve Jobs Already Told Us the Answer)

By Steve Buckstein

The Oregon legislature will embark on an “impossible mission” to achieve student success in our public school system. Members of the Joint Committee on Student Success will travel the state this year, asking everyone they meet what constitutes success in their communities. They then will return to the marble halls of the State Capitol and recommend that every school be mandated to do “what works” somewhere—of course, at a higher cost to taxpayers than they’re already paying.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

Steve Buckstein is Senior Policy Analyst and Founder of Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization.

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Oregon Parents Deserve to Be the Voice for Kids’ Education Options

By Bobbie Jager

For the second year in a row, Oregon has reported the third-lowest graduation rate in the country. With a four-year adjusted public high school graduation rate of 74.8% (2015-16), Oregon only beats Nevada and New Mexico, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

The typical response to this kind of bad news is for teachers unions and legislators to claim that taxpayers are “underfunding” public schools; and that’s why so many kids don’t make it to graduation. But Oregon already spends more on K-12 education than 33 other states. According to the National Education Association’s Rankings & Estimates report for 2016 and 2017, revenue per Oregon student in Average Daily Attendance is nearly $14,000, including local, state, and federal funding. That puts Oregon more than four percent above the national average in school spending.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

Bobbie Jager, Oregon’s 2012 “Mother of the Year,” is a parental choice advocate and the School Choice Outreach Coordinator for the Portland-based Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization. A version of this article was originally published by the Pamplin Media Group and appeared in The Portland Tribune on January 25, 2018.

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School Choice Is More Than “Just Choosing a Different Brick Building”

By Kathryn Hickok

This week is National School Choice Week, the world’s largest celebration of educational choice. Held nationwide every January, the Week raises awareness about the K-12 possibilities available to children and families, while spotlighting the benefits of parental choice. More than 313 events will take place in Oregon alone, sponsored by private schools, charter schools, and other organizations. The Week is nonpartisan and nonpolitical.

Read the rest of the article here.

Kathryn Hickok is Publications Director and Director of the Children’s Scholarship Fund-Oregon program at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization.

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Cascade Policy Institute Celebrates National School Choice Week 2018

January 16, 2018 

For Immediate Release 

Media Contact:
Steve Buckstein

503-242-0900

Oregonians will participate in nation’s largest celebration of education reform

Portland, Ore. – Cascade Policy Institute will hold a special event in celebration of National School Choice Week 2018, organizers announced today. Cascade’s January 24 “Policy Picnic” roundtable will highlight the diversity of education options for K-12 students and call for expanded access to school choice for all Oregon children.

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National School Choice Week Celebrates Diversity in K-12 Education

By Kathryn Hickok

National School Choice Week is the world’s largest celebration of educational options for all children. Held nationwide every January, National School Choice Week raises awareness about the K-12 education options available to children and families, while spotlighting the benefits of school choice. This year’s celebration will be January 21-27.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

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Give Oregon Kids the Power of Educational Choice, Like Kids in Florida

By Kathryn Hickok

Denisha Merriweather failed third grade twice. Today, she is finishing her master’s degree, thanks to Florida’s Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The key to Denisha’s success was her godmother’s ability to remove Denisha from a school that was failing her, and to send her to the school that provided her with the support she needed.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

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Taxpayers Aren’t at Fault for Oregon’s Abysmal Graduation Rate

Taxpayers Aren’t at Fault for Oregon’s Abysmal Graduation Rate

By Kathryn Hickok

Willamette Week recently reported that, sadly, Oregon has the third-lowest graduation rate in the country, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Oregon’s four-year adjusted public high school graduation rate was 74.8% in 2015-16. Only Nevada and New Mexico have lower graduation rates.

Read the rest of the article here.

 

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Win $15,000 for a video telling your school choice story

Choices in Ed Video Competition
Entry Deadline is December 1, 2017

Dear School Choice Supporters:

Some of you entered Cascade Policy Institute’s 2009 Oregon School Choice Video Contest; sharing your stories of how school choice helped you or your children, or why you wanted more choices in education.

Now, the Foundation for Excellence in Education has launched a nationwide Choices in Ed Video Competition.  Based on the sincerity and passion of the videos, eight winners will receive cash prizes from $5,000 to $15,000 each. Enter, and you might be one of them!

You’re eligible to enter if you’re a student, parent or guardian, or alumnus of existing choice programs (public school/open enrollment, charter, magnet, private school, virtual/blended, or homeschool), or a person who wants more educational choice in your state.

Videos must be under two minutes long, and must be successfully uploaded by 11:59pm EST (8:59pm Pacific time) on December 1, 2017.

Be sure to read About the Contest, the Rules and How to Enter. Then, ENTER TODAY.

We hope one or more of you will be winners. We would like to share your videos with other Oregonians whether or not you win this national competition. That way, we can help tell your story and use it to move toward more School Choices in our state.

Here are three of our favorite videos submitted to our Contest in 2009; two from students and one from a parent

Shoes

Rylee’s Choice

School Choice Coffee Analogy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can see many other videos submitted to our contest here. They may give you some ideas for framing your Choices in Ed Video Competition submission.

Sincerely,

Steve Buckstein
Senior Policy Analyst and Founder
Cascade Policy Institute ▪ School Choice for Oregon
Portland, Oregon
Office Phone: (503) 242-0900
Email: steven@cascadepolicy.org

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Ten Years After Milton Friedman

One of the greatest minds of our era passed away in November 2006. This Sunday would have marked his 104th birthday. Milton Friedman won the Nobel Prize for Economics; but it was his ability to relate complex economic ideas in simple terms the average person could understand, and his devotion to liberty, that made him truly great.

Milton and his economist wife Rose spent literally decades researching, writing, speaking, and popularizing free-market economics and its connection to liberty and freedom. Rose actually grew up here in Portland, and it was my privilege to call her and Milton my friends.

This Friday, July 29th, the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice will celebrate the 10th and final Friedman Legacy Day, which began after Dr. Friedman passed away. Rather than continue these annual celebrations, the foundation, created by and named after Milton and Rose Friedman, will move forward with a new name and a new strategic plan. Both will be announced on the foundation website, at www.edchoice.org.

Please join all of us at Cascade Policy Institute as we celebrate the lives and contributions of a great couple, and renew our commitment to promote their ideas and ideals, which include the goal of every child being able to attend the public, private, religious, or home school of their choice, with funding following the student.

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Portland Schools Need More Than a New Superintendent

Portland school superintendent Carole Smith announced her resignation this week after nine years on the job.

The next steps are predictable: The school board will conduct a national search for a successor and eventually sign someone to an expensive contract. After a short honeymoon, the new leader will sink into the bureaucratic quagmire and leave after a short and forgettable tenure.

Management experts know that if system results are disappointing, you need to change the system, not the people. The single most important change Portland could make would be to redesign how the money flows.

Right now, tax dollars go to school bureaucracies, regardless of results. Students are assigned to schools like widgets in a factory, and few families have a “Plan B” if they are unhappy.

A better option would be to enact Educational Savings Accounts (ESAs). This would allow every family to have their share of per-student revenue diverted from the bureaucracy to the student’s ESA, where alternative services could be purchased. Families would instantly have dozens of exciting options.

Equally important, ESAs would incentivize school administrators to make each school perform at a high level, thereby benefiting all students, including those not using ESAs.

Carole Smith made her share of mistakes, but the Portland school district needs institutional change more than it needs a charismatic new leader.

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