Month: October 2010

Renewable Energy Via Freedom, Not Force

Todd Wynn

Renewable Energy Via Freedom, Not Force

By Todd Wynn

This article was published as a guest column on EarthTechling.com.

Many believe the free market and renewable energy are at odds. Renewable energy advocates proclaim fossil fuels will continue to dominate the energy landscape, even if consumers perceive them to be rife with environmental issues. This belief has driven political leaders to subsidize renewable energy development, mandate utilities to provide renewable energy options, and force citizens to purchase them. The free-market stance looks at the situation differently.

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Measure 76, Just Another Money Grab

Measure 76 will take a law which sunsets in 2014 and turn it into a constitutional amendment reserving in perpetuity 15% of lottery proceeds for water, parks and wildlife programs. Approved in 1998, the original measure was intended to fix a dilapidated park system and improve watersheds throughout Oregon. Today, many of the measure’s original objectives have been accomplished, raising the question of whether any government program can ever end.

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Cascade in the News: John Charles on KATU

In this KATU segment aired last Friday (10/15), John Charles predicts a downward spiral for TriMet if it continues to award expensive benefits to their employees.  Click here to watch the clip.

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Intel-ligent Stimulus

Christina Martin
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By Christina Martin

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Intel announced this week that it will bring almost 7,000 new jobs to Oregon by expanding in Hillsboro. That is 7,000 individuals who will be paying taxes and spending money in Oregon. This is unusually good news in this time of economic trouble and high unemployment.

 But why did Intel choose Oregon when it could build anywhere? Especially when certain Oregon taxes are significantly higher than taxes in many other states. Intel has a number of special tax deals with the state of Oregon and local governments that allow it to keep a competitive edge in a world marketplace. It gets special tax exemptions on much of its property and equipment. Furthermore, most of its income is also exempt from Oregon’s corporate taxes because the company sells most of its products outside of the state. Yet, even many who a year ago claimed that Oregon’s businesses aren’t paying their “fair share” will be encouraged by today’s news. That’s because 7,000 private sector jobs will breathe fresh life into the area. (more…)

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Analysis of Measure 26-119

$125 Million in General Obligation Bonds for TriMet
By John A. Charles, Jr.
October 11, 2010

Measure 26-119 is being billed by TriMet as a bond measure to help improve bus service for handicapped riders and the elderly. Indeed, at the August meeting of the TriMet board, roughly a dozen handicapped individuals were brought in by the TriMet staff to testify in support of the measure. After a short discussion and virtually no due diligence, the TriMet board voted unanimously to place the measure on the November ballot.

However, a careful reading of the ballot title indicates that bond funds will not be restricted to bus improvements. TriMet management will have full discretion to spend the funds on any capital project. Moreover, the bus projects TriMet is promising to undertake with these funds will only cost $82 million at most, leaving $43 million leftover for undesignated uses.

Given that the TriMet staff announced in July that federal funding for the Milwaukie light rail project will only be 50%, rather than the hoped-for 60%, it’s clear why this ballot measure was rushed to the board for the August meeting. There is a high probability that bond revenues will be used to backfill any shortfall in local match money for both the Milwaukie light rail project and the Lake Oswego-to-Portland streetcar project.

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Facing Reality

By Americans for Prosperity and Cascade Policy Institute

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The immediate effects of the most recent recession have hit Oregon especially hard. Declining incomes, diminished job opportunities and depressed property values have stalled spending and shrunk savings. In addition to these immediate effects are the longer-term effects that are just now being projected. State government in Oregon will emerge from the recession with reduced revenues and a reduced potential for economic growth to sustain the rates of state government spending growth enacted prior to the recession. The most recent revenue forecast projects general fund revenues to be $1.27 billion lower than forecast at the end of the 2009 legislative session. Last year, Oregon Governor Kulongoski declared, “Oregon cannot continue to fund public services at the levels funded today.” Rather than make minor revisions, Governor Kulongoski argued a “reset” is necessary, charging that “we must re-think the way we deliver the services provided by state government.”

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Private Scholarships Bring Kids Hope Today

Kathryn Hickok

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by Kathryn Hickok

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This month’s film opening of Waiting for “Superman” has put the spotlight on low-income parents trying to break cycles of poverty and low achievement by sending their kids to charter schools. Sadly, these children face a lottery process that makes their futures dependent on a roll of the dice.

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Children’s Scholarship Fund Kids Aren’t Waiting for Superman!

Kathryn Hickok

Children’s Scholarship Fund Kids Aren’t Waiting for Superman!

by Kathryn Hickok

October’s nationwide opening of the new film Waiting for “Superman” is igniting new interest in the desperate desire of thousands of low-income parents to get their kids out of failing, one-size-fits-all public schools into better-performing charter schools. The five children poignantly profiled in the film face barriers to their dreams in the form of too few charter school seats and a lottery acceptance process that makes their futures dependent on a roll of the dice.

Charter schools are fast becoming a vital education option for thousands of low-income students throughout the U.S. But immediate, viable, successful alternatives to failing public schools have existed, often right in parents’ own neighborhoods, for decades – and in much of the U.S., they pre-date the American public school system itself.

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Heritage releases video addressing Obama tax cuts

For those interested in the national debate on tax cuts, here’s an interesting video from the Heritage Foundation.

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